Larned State Hospital Turns to Law Enforcement Figure for Hospital Superintendent

I am calling attention once again to the long-standing troubles at one of the two Kansas state psychiatric hospitals, Larned State Hospital, which has had over the last few years a host of staffing, management, clinical and accreditation problems. I am reaching back a bit, now six months to refer to an article, published June 29 of last year, 2016, by the online arm of KHI News Service of Topeka, “Longtime Kansas State Attorney Name Larned State Hospital Superintendent by Bryan Thompson.” The new hospital superintendent is Mr. Bill Rein, long experienced in state mental health affairs. Mr. Rein brings a vast amount of experience with him, including his former positions as the former chief counsel for the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services, which oversees the state’s mental health hospitals in Larned and Osawatomie. He also had been the former chief counsel for the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services, which oversees the state’s mental health hospitals in Larned and Osawatomie. He also had supervised attorneys representing the state hospitals from 1984 to 1987. So this man has had an unusual career of experience in mental health policy planning, drafting mental health-related legislation and direct experience in a vital sector of legal representation of the state’s mental hospitals.

 

Bill Rein the new superintendent of Larned State Hospital since June 2016
CREDIT FILE PHOTO, KHI News Service, Topeka KS

 

When Mr. Rein was appointed he spoke of the tasks facing him and showed an unusual and encouraging grasp of the magnitude of the problems that face this hospital in particular which mirror those of other state hospitals around the country, including long-term inadequate funding, overworked staff forced into overtime work shifts much too frequently causing high staff turnover, difficulties recruiting care and professional staff at all levels because of the very rural location of the hospital with a small’ish surrounding population base, and particular difficulties attracting professional mental health staff because of low salaries that are noncompetitive.

This man is shouldering a very large task and this writer hopes he can turn this hospital and vitally needed system around in time. I hope to watch and monitor developments and bring them to the reader in the future. Kansas hopefully can become an example to other states of what it will take to put in place quality based reforms at the state psychiatric hospital system level for other states facing almost exactly the same problems, of which there are more than a few in this country.

 

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The Simplest Mental Health Reform Blueprint

In an unassuming online article published by WDKI television of Kansas, “Mental health reform proposed in Kansas,”there is laid out a summary of the initiative(s) now stirring in Kansas that show the simplest and some of the most needed mental health reform measures needed in this country. The irony is that they are incredibly simple, intuitive and long known as needed by policy wonks in the field and providers of all types in the mental health professions.

They boil down to basically simply and (stupidly enough) restoring some of the most basic lynch pins of our system of mental health care delivery.

Those essential foundations or struts of the superstructures of local or regional mental health care delivery systems of ANY size, consists of two basic things, money (“funding” in the ever dominant bureaucratic talk) and providers. Such a non-complex concept that we are starting to circle around to and rediscover. [Read angry irony in that last sentence please].

The last 20 years have seen state legislatures  cut funding for state and local mental  health services, fight Medicaid expansion to help provide mental health insurance and thereafter access to the ‘new’ privatized’ models of MH services agencies {they used to be called “mental health centers” in each country]. In most states, the new mental health reforms were SUPPOSED to cover the uninsured but somehow they often did not because of limited funding {read “block funding”]. Block funding as a concept originated mostly under the Nixon administration and since then has been largely used by a political party of a certain flavor tp punish frowned upon governmental services, such as Planned Parenthood, National Public Radio, and other entities, you get the idea. The concept was that funding was not cut off to avoid too much blowback, but given in limited and sometimes ever shrinking amounts with the admonition to choose upon what to spend it, leaving the do-gooders in the agencies to make the cuts and make the less than kind decisions and “be the bad guys.” That way legislators could crow to their constituents that they had not increased spending and had not cut funding [the latter often untrue but who’s quibbling here, this is politics…).

The other major pillar of deconstruction of the old county-based mental health system has been the ever shrinking pool of psychiatrists, counsellors, substance abuse counsellors, psychologists, child therapists of all disciplines and especially outreach workers in the old public health system sense, the “outriders,” who visited homes and if nothing else dropped the essential daily antipsychotic doses into patients’ mouths and made sure they swallowed them. It’s called “compliance.” Training programs until the last 10 years have done nothing but stay static in numbers of graduates or shrink dramatically as my one training program did for years. Some few departments of psychiatry closed or merged such as the famous occurrence at Tufts University Dept. of Psychiatry in Boston decades ago which was essentially saved and bought out by Harvard.

Reading the article makes me realize it has taken 30 years to pummel into the heads of the so-called reformers that three simple needed measures: outpatient services including residential systems of living centers for displaced mentally ill out of destroyed or as they would say in the Peron dictatorship years in Argentina, “disappeared,” hospital beds, and increase the funding and programs for providers, in this case, psychiatric residents. Sen. Chris Murphy’s bill and Former Rep. Patrick Kennedy’s now in effect merged national mental health reform bill does the same things largely except on a national basis

Dr Harold Carmel MD of Duke Psychiatry said now over a decade ago, “it will take us 10 years to get back to where we were 10 years ago.” At least we have real starts now.

 

History of Osawatomie State Hospital in Kansas as National Metaphor

Ms. Megan Hart of the Kansas Public Radio Station KCUR and the group Heartland Health Monitor partner KHI News Service has been following and chronicling the long sad story of the Osawatomie State Hospital in Kansas for quite some time now, nearly two years or perhaps longer, that this writer has been aware. Ms. Hart’s latest article, “Osawatomie State Hospital: A Leading Light for Mental Health Care Slowly Dims.” published  July 25, 2016 documents very ably both the issues of this state hospital, its parent state, and the social vise that all too many such state hospitals more or less find themselves facing in this time of hoped for reform.This piece of American state hospital history is in many ways not unique to the fascinating and very checkered social history of the American state psychiatric hospital for public inpatient care of the seriously and chronically mentally ill.

Continue reading “History of Osawatomie State Hospital in Kansas as National Metaphor”